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2003-02-12 18:16:47+00:00 - Broken Glass - (mikeduell@aol.comGenius)


Hi everyone. I'm the oldest Newbie You'll ever find. Been watching the show now for about four years, and haven't finished it yet. Just reached a deal so that I soon have the entire series. I do have a question. I know that the conclusion of the show was rushed due to its untimely end. Was the show fully resolved? Was the broken glass in almost every episode ever explained? I'm not looking for specific answers, but adding fuel to the fire to watch it.

2003-02-13 03:01:54+00:00 - Re: Broken Glass - (queritmo@aol.com)


>From: mikeduell@aol.comGenius (MikeDuell) > >I do have a question. I know that the conclusion of the show was rushed due to its untimely end. Was the show fully resolved? > Resolved? In a way. Fully resolved? Thankfully, no. Shows like this should never be fully resolved. Shows like this hold a mirror up to life itself - and life is never fully resolved. >Was the broken glass in almost every episode ever explained? There is more than one interpretation for the broken glass - everything from being just a dramatic element, to my person choice, that the broken glass is a mirror being shattered. A mirror which is reflecting a false view of self and of existence. >From the dozen episodes I've seen, it's fantastic, and cannot imagine why it was cancelled. Maybe it struck a nerve with Them after all. > It was canceled due to, a) low ratings, b) interference with the show's creator and producer, the great Larry Hertzog, and c) it damn well did strike a nerve with Them in their various forms and levels. >NWM succeed in wrapping it all up? If not, are there plans for a novel or other TV movie? > Nowhere Man - one's search for truth, personal identity and authentic purpose in life is a timeless theme appropriate to any day and times. But we are not supposed to ask such questions in today's "environment". Conformity and acquiescence is celebrated as noble, righteous and the only appropriate way to live. Nowhere Man would not prosper in such an environment. Shows such as Nowhere Man require a thinking viewership not afraid to ask tough questions - two qualities that have all but disappeared today. When Nowhere Man left the air several years ago it left a host of NowhereMenAndWomen around the world who still believe in finding truth, learning more about who they really are and discovering purpose in life beyond just driving SUVs and watching faux "reality" television. But like Tom Veil, we are destined to stumble around in a maze of contrived fictions promoted by those who do not seek the truth, but fear it and who seek to bury it so deeply as to render it unrecognizable. Q

2003-02-13 04:42:42+00:00 - Re: Broken Glass - (mikeduell@aol.comGenius)


>Resolved? In a way. Fully resolved? Thankfully, no. Shows like this >should never be fully resolved. Shows like this hold a mirror up to >life itself - and life is never fully resolved. > I agree that it should never be fully resolved, but I was curious, given that Larry Hertzog may have already planned out season 2 and may not have had time to tell the story as he had intended, if he finished it the way he wanted to. I'm just looking at it as I did with Babylon 5. It was a five season story arc. What if it had been canceled after season 3? JMS could have written a couple of scripts to close the show, but it would be missing two years worth of info and storyline. I'm sure that Hertzog did the best he could, perhaps with little time to do it. Assuming that he didn't have a whole lot of notice about cancellation, I wonder if he had the time to really resolve the show faithfully to his original vision. Has he ever said one way or the other?

2003-02-13 05:14:21+00:00 - Re: Broken Glass - (queritmo@aol.com)


>From: mikeduell@aol.comGenius (MikeDuell) > >I agree that it should never be fully resolved, but I was curious, given that Larry Hertzog may have already planned out season 2 and may not have had time to tell the story as he had intended, if he finished it the way he wanted to. > If I may presume to speak for him, Larry did not tell the FIRST season the way he wanted to. His creative control and vision for the show was seriously interfered with as the season went along. He made references at that time to the "Evil Rat" as I recall, which some might say is a damned good description of that branch of THEM that he was working with to get Nowhere Man on the air. Network television is a terrible place to tell a coherent, intelligent story anyway, what with the minimal attention space of the viewing public, the corporate b. s. that goes along with producing any program in that forum, and the obsession with ratings that dimwitted network television executes sell their souls to. But in short, the 25th episode of Nowhere Man did well to resolve that arc of the show to that point, given the premature ending. But we should have gotten so much more. >I'm sure that Hertzog did the best he could, perhaps with little time to do it. Assuming that he didn't have a whole lot of notice about cancellation, I wonder if he had the time to really resolve the show faithfully to his original vision. Has he ever said one way or the other? > I don't remember specific quotes from him on this issue, but I doubt if Larry could say he had time to resolve the show in a way true to his vision and intent. It was a miracle Nowhere Man got on at all - and we can be grateful we got 25 episodes of it. But Nowhere Man joined a list of unique, special, legendary programs such as Frank's Place, My So-Called Life, Once & Again, A Year In The Life and others which elevated television into a true art form instead of the usual bottom-feeding swill which unfortunately is its essential nature. Someone please buy a single damned television network and turn Lawrence Hertzog, Marshall Herskovitz, Ed Zwick, Winnie Holtzman and others of their calibre loose without interference or corporate bureaucratic empty-headed shallowness. What an incredible source of entertainment that would be. Q

2003-02-13 17:23:03+00:00 - Re: Broken Glass - (mikeduell@aol.comGenius)


>Here's a repost of the "Broken Glass FAQ" Are there any other FAQ for NWM? Thanks!

2003-02-17 11:23:28+00:00 - Re: Broken Glass - (legalize+jeeves@mail.xmission.com)


[Please do not mail me a copy of your followup] queritmo@aol.com (QUERITMO) spake the secret code <20030213001421.28305.00000561@mb-cm.aol.com> thusly: >[...] Network television is a terrible >place to tell a coherent, intelligent story anyway, what with the minimal >attention space of the viewing public [...] I don't believe it is the attention span of the viewing public that is the problem, but rather the attention span of executives. Just look at the convoluted story arcs that develop in the daily soap operas if you don't believe that the public can follow complex plot developments. Miniseries are also popular and these most definately have story arcs (anyone remember "Shogun" from the 70s?). However, it seems that evolving story arcs have very limited outlets in television and this is due solely to the executives controlling such things rather than anything to do with the audience. -- "The Direct3D Graphics Pipeline"-- code samples, sample chapter, FAQ: <http://www.xmission.com/~legalize/book/> izfree: Open source tools for Windows Installer <http://izfree.sourceforge.net>

2003-02-24 18:48:35-08:00 - Re: Broken Glass - (Larry Hertzog <lh@mindspring.com>)


In article <20030212220154.13108.00000207@mb-fg.aol.com>, queritmo@aol.com says... > >From: mikeduell@aol.comGenius (MikeDuell) > > > >I do have a question. I know that the conclusion of the show was rushed due > to its untimely end. Was the show fully resolved? > > > > Resolved? In a way. Fully resolved? Thankfully, no. Shows like this > should never be fully resolved. Shows like this hold a mirror up to > life itself - and life is never fully resolved. > > > >Was the broken glass in almost every episode ever explained? > > There is more than one interpretation for the broken glass - everything > from being just a dramatic element, to my person choice, that the broken glass > is a mirror being shattered. A mirror which is reflecting > a false view of self and of existence. > > > >From the dozen episodes I've seen, it's fantastic, and cannot imagine why it > was cancelled. Maybe it struck a nerve with Them after all. > > > > It was canceled due to, a) low ratings, b) interference with the show's > creator and producer, the great Larry Hertzog, and c) it damn well did > strike a nerve with Them in their various forms and levels. > > > >NWM succeed in wrapping it all up? If not, are there plans for a novel or > other TV movie? > > > > Nowhere Man - one's search for truth, personal identity and authentic > purpose in life is a timeless theme appropriate to any day and times. > But we are not supposed to ask such questions in today's > "environment". Conformity and acquiescence is celebrated as noble, > righteous and the only appropriate way to live. Nowhere Man would > not prosper in such an environment. Shows such as Nowhere Man > require a thinking viewership not afraid to ask tough questions - two > qualities that have all but disappeared today. When Nowhere Man left > the air several years ago it left a host of NowhereMenAndWomen > around the world who still believe in finding truth, learning more > about who they really are and discovering purpose in life beyond just > driving SUVs and watching faux "reality" television. But like Tom Veil, > we are destined to stumble around in a maze of contrived fictions > promoted by those who do not seek the truth, but fear it and who seek > to bury it so deeply as to render it unrecognizable. > > Q > > Q, I'd appreciate changing the "great" Larry Hertzog to the "large" Larry Hertzog. It's so much more fitting. Thanks. Larry