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1996-04-09 00:00:00 - 'Cover Identity' theory - (malos001@maroon.tc.umn.edu)


More and more now, I like the idea that 'Tom Veil' is a completely fabricated identity. The whole thing is an experiment, using one of Their operatives. They need to find out just how effective this "memory implant" thing can be. They also have the side benefit of rooting-out weak links in their chain. This might lead to some interesting episodes even after the "truth" is told. The operative could find out the real truth about "Tom Veil" but NOT be told who he (the operative) really is. That could lead to a whole different set of interesting storylines. Or maybe his real memories ARE completely restored but pieces of the fake "Tom Veil" identity keep creeping back in. This may be a completely ludicrous idea but it sure is fun to speculate on the possibilities. (and it sure is great to see wonderful new episodes like "Through a Lens Darkly") Bob Malos - Univ of Minnesota - malos001@maroon.tc.umn.edu

1996-04-11 00:00:00 - Re: 'Cover Identity' theory - (John Bruce Jones <jjones@emory.edu>)


On Tue, 9 Apr 1996, Bob Malos wrote: > More and more now, I like the idea that 'Tom Veil' is a completely fabricated > identity. The whole thing is an experiment, using one of Their operatives. > They need to find out just how effective this "memory implant" thing can be. > They also have the side benefit of rooting-out weak links in their chain. > > This might lead to some interesting episodes even after the "truth" is told. > The operative could find out the real truth about "Tom Veil" but NOT be > told who he (the operative) really is. That could lead to a whole different > set of interesting storylines. Or maybe his real memories ARE completely > restored but pieces of the fake "Tom Veil" identity keep creeping back in. > . . . Based on how things have unfolded so far, and particularly this last episode (esp. 1. when Tom tells the psychiatrist "I'm not one of you" and the doctor replies, "You think not?" and 2. We get another brief flashback of the hidden Agenda mockup from overhead among the montage of scenes Tom sees when he intentionally looks into the camera lens mirror) this seems like one of the the most likely or coherent directions the narrative might take (unless, of course, its creators indeed monitor the list and intentionally script episodes to counteract our expectations and predictions--which is one thing that fascinates me about the list as a potentially interactive "system." A situation like this would help keep the series "alive" longer not only by suggesting more or less fruitful creative directions for such powers that be, if they choose to use the resource, but also allows us to respond and to some degree "shape" the program by favorable or unfavorable responses, degree of our suspension of disbelief, etc--again, assuming a program or network rep is voluntarily or as part of his or her job monitoring the list from time to time, thus the "if you're listening" or "if youre out there" qualifiers that accompany some of the praise and comments some of us offer. Total Recall (1990) and later Megaville (with Billy Zane in 1991) have already used the plot device of giving the main character--usu. a detective, spy, or cop--an antagonistic alter ego the other may know nothing else about. When in other sci-fi, fantasy, horror, the double becomes physical, we get clones, twins, robots, stuff that other stuff that has been suggested on the list. I might add that so far as it has been developed in sci-fi this tradition has played very much on MALE fears of abandonment, loss of security, etc. (Dead or unreachable mothers or mother-figures often figure prominently). I would love to hear from the women on the list on how they regard the whole quest set-up here, how they do or do not identify with Tom, whatever.. I think Fox tried somewhat to break through the traditional gender barrier (as its been written/filmed so far, anyway) with its short-lived series VR5 last year (?), in which its protagonist was a telephone line repairperson named Sidney (hm..) who had a twin who supposedly died in an childhood automobile accident Sidney survived and which might have had something to do with her secret FATHER's work in a mysterious oorganization which he documented in a secret book which Sidney searches for and meanwhile is being pursued because among other things she is a genius at using computers and telephones to create virtual interactive hookups and... well, as you can see it, it was an awfully busy plot. Maybe thats what sunk it, tho it did try some things no other series had (or has--incl Nowhere Man, since NwM returns to a lot of stock reps. of women, I think.). But I wouldnt be surprised if some of the VR5 ideas or people are represented in the NwM creative process somewhere--even tho the Tom we know so far prides himself on "not know[ing] a lot about computers [ and being] more of a beer, babes, and basebase kind of guy" (that show was majorly about gender performance), technology is almost always there as a sort of antagonist in each episode giving him something to fight against. VR5 also shared a lot with 1995's The Net with Sandra Bullock in its characterizations and certain scenes. I posted not too long ago asking if anyone else had thought about this or if it had been discussed or whatever. Maybe I missed any responses, maybe there were none, but I say again, where (if anywhere) does The Net go that NwM does not? On the other hand, what can the series do that a feature film (or this feature film in particular) cannot? (Maybe the potential for growth over time enters in here, as Chuck has suggested in another post---btw Chuck, I'm getting ready to write back, bear with me :) ) And most particularly, how implicated is gender in this dif? I recall noticed a whole spate of postings back when Tom walked off from a potentially good relationship after saving a women's family farm from the bad corporate moguls back in one episode. I'd love to hear everyone's thoughts about the shows use of the angel v femme fatale concepts and representations of relationships so far in general, parental as well as romantic.. I guess since the show is about homelessness and exile, there has to be a very anti-domestic bent to it (cf The Hitcher). In that way maybe its classically "American" (?)... Several dozen ideas that have been incubating, John Jones jjones@dooley.cc.emory.edu

1996-04-11 00:00:00 - Re: 'Cover Identity' theory - (SpoonMan01@gnn.com)


In article <malos001.74.00487232@maroon.tc.umn.edu> Bob Malos wrote: >Date: Tue, 9 Apr 1996 08:18:43 LOCAL >From: malos001@maroon.tc.umn.edu (Bob Malos) >Newsgroups: alt.tv.nowhere-man >Subject: 'Cover Identity' theory > >More and more now, I like the idea that 'Tom Veil' is a completely > fabricated >identity. The whole thing is an experiment, using one of Their operatives. >They need to find out just how effective this "memory implant" thing can > be. >They also have the side benefit of rooting-out weak links in their chain. > >This might lead to some interesting episodes even after the "truth" is > told. >The operative could find out the real truth about "Tom Veil" but NOT be >told who he (the operative) really is. That could lead to a whole > different >set of interesting storylines. Or maybe his real memories ARE completely >restored but pieces of the fake "Tom Veil" identity keep creeping back in. > >This may be a completely ludicrous idea but it sure is fun to speculate on > the >possibilities. (and it sure is great to see wonderful new episodes like >"Through a Lens Darkly") > >Bob Malos - Univ of Minnesota - malos001@maroon.tc.umn.edu This is *exactly* my speculation too. > ________________________________________________________________ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------