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1996-05-12 00:00:00 - Oh dear: "Marathon" - (ai448@FreeNet.Carleton.CA)


Well, I was perfectly willing to come into this newsgroup last week and praise an episode that I liked, so I guess I ought to voice my opinion on one that I didn't. I'll only give my impressions, and no spoilers, but I'll leave some space anyway. I saw Marathon (or Bed of Lies, as UPN titled it) on Friday night, and it's hard to believe that it was an episode of the same series that gave us Zero Minus Ten the week before. I can understand that any show will have its highs and lows, but I didn't expect Nowhere Man to hit this deep a valley after such a pronounced peak the week before. I seem to remember a while back that Larry Hertzog said UPN would have liked Nowhere Man to be more like The A-Team, and I can certainly see that wish realized in this episode. There was nothing sublime about Marathon; nothing going on beneath the surface. Perhaps the best word to describe this episode is "prozaic": it is what it appears to be, and nothing more. Incredibly, Art Monterastelli, the writer responsible for Through a Lens Darkly, is given the credit for writing this episode, although I'd be willing to bet that he was several drafts removed from the final version. More than anything else, Marathon has the feel of being produced in a kitchen that contained far too many cooks, many of whom were completely unfamiliar with both the ingredients and the mixing utensils. In other words, it felt like non-writers had hijacked this episode, and they had rewritten it in a committee room. The one saving grace of the episode was Bruce Greenwood who, as always, gave it his best. Of course, an actor can't save a rotten script, as this episode ably demonstrates. The only reason I hold a glimmer of hope for Gemini is that it was cowritten by Hertzog himself. After seeing the last few episodes (and reading Larry's postings), it's obvious that a tug-of-war was taking place over the direction of the series, and I'm interested to see which side had the final say on the last episode. Maybe the pendulum swung back to the creator's side one last time. So, don't get your hopes up, folks. If you liked last week's episode, you're almost definitely not a "clue-head", and I can't imagine that you'll care for Marathon. Kevin -- Kevin Mason ai448@freenet.carleton.ca

1996-05-13 00:00:00 - Re: Oh dear: "Marathon" - (kromkam@ecf.toronto.edu)


---> MILD SPOILERS FOLLOW <--- In article <4n5lin$fbn@freenet-news.carleton.ca>, Kevin Mason <ai448@FreeNet.Carleton.CA> wrote: > >Well, I was perfectly willing to come into this newsgroup last week >and praise an episode that I liked, so I guess I ought to voice my >opinion on one that I didn't. > > >I'll only give my impressions, and no spoilers, but I'll leave some >space anyway. > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >I saw Marathon (or Bed of Lies, as UPN titled it) on Friday night, and it's >hard to believe that it was an episode of the same series that gave us Zero >Minus Ten the week before. I can understand that any show will have its >highs and lows, but I didn't expect Nowhere Man to hit this deep a valley >after such a pronounced peak the week before. > >I seem to remember a while back that Larry Hertzog said UPN would have >liked Nowhere Man to be more like The A-Team, and I can certainly see >that wish realized in this episode. There was nothing sublime about >Marathon; nothing going on beneath the surface. Perhaps the best word to >describe this episode is "prozaic": it is what it appears to be, and >nothing more. > >Incredibly, Art Monterastelli, the writer responsible for Through a Lens >Darkly, is given the credit for writing this episode, although I'd be >willing to bet that he was several drafts removed from the final version. >More than anything else, Marathon has the feel of being produced in a >kitchen that contained far too many cooks, many of whom were completely >unfamiliar with both the ingredients and the mixing utensils. In other >words, it felt like non-writers had hijacked this episode, and they had >rewritten it in a committee room. > >The one saving grace of the episode was Bruce Greenwood who, as always, >gave it his best. Of course, an actor can't save a rotten script, as >this episode ably demonstrates. > > >The only reason I hold a glimmer of hope for Gemini is that it was >cowritten by Hertzog himself. After seeing the last few episodes (and >reading Larry's postings), it's obvious that a tug-of-war was taking place >over the direction of the series, and I'm interested to see which side had >the final say on the last episode. Maybe the pendulum swung back to the >creator's side one last time. > > >So, don't get your hopes up, folks. If you liked last week's episode, >you're almost definitely not a "clue-head", and I can't imagine that >you'll care for Marathon. > > > >Kevin > >-- >Kevin Mason >ai448@freenet.carleton.ca I don';t think even clue-heads would like Marathon. It was, quite simply, BORING. There was nothing there! In fact, I'm surprised they didn't call this Gemini pt. 1 and Next week Gemini pt 2. The episode ends like it should be a two-parter, and quite frankly the whole episode seemed like a set up for next week. Beyond that it still didn't do a very good job. It wasn't completely offensive, but it certainly wasnt quality television. Andy K.

1996-05-13 00:00:00 - Re: Oh dear: "Marathon" - (chrgrfan@aol.com)


Well, I saw "Marathon" on Friday as well, and I'd have to disagree. I liked "Zero Minus Ten" quite a bit, and was just as enthralled as everyone else with "Through a Lens Darkly". But yes, I admit, I want to know what's behind this whole ordeal. Is that really so wrong? Can't I like both types of episodes? I mean, lately, all I've read is how you're either into the "get into TV's mind" eps, or you're a "clue-head", but never in-between. I like this show for both aspects, and possibly because it can do both well on a regular basis. I liked "Marathon", and am not ashamed to say it. In fact, if the series is to end as it appears it will, these last 2 episodes are about as close as we're gonna get to a sense of closure, and I for one will happy to see them. ChargerFan chrgrfan@aol.com

1996-05-13 00:00:00 - Re: Oh dear: "Marathon" - (the13thmonkey@pipeline.com)


In article <4n5lin$fbn@freenet-news.carleton.ca>, Kevin Mason writes: > >Well, I was perfectly willing to come into this newsgroup last week >and praise an episode that I liked, so I guess I ought to voice my >opinion on one that I didn't. >

1996-05-13 00:00:00 - Re: Oh dear: "Marathon" - (Andrew_Perry@Brown.edu)


In article <4n6elo$de2@news2.h1.usa.pipeline.com>, the13thmonkey@pipeline.com wrote: >In article <4n5lin$fbn@freenet-news.carleton.ca>, Kevin Mason writes: > >> >>Well, I was perfectly willing to come into this newsgroup last week >>and praise an episode that I liked, so I guess I ought to voice my >>opinion on one that I didn't. >> >From what I saw of the previews (it hasn't aired here yet), it seemed >incredibly reminiscent of THE THREE DAYS OF CONDOR (starring Robert >Redford). It wasn't just reminiscent, it was a direct homage. Especially the scene with what's her face on the telephone. When the guy with the headset answered, I was already saying, "This is the Major" under my breath, and when he said "This is the Fire Chief" instead, and then proceeded to mimic most of the Major's lines, until Tom took control, I was quite pleased. I thought it was a good episode, but I could see how _Three Days of the Condor_ would be required viewing to really enjoy it. Kinda like last night's Pinky and the Brain, which began with an utterly wonderful and brilliant remake of The Third Man. My roommate, who hasn't seen _The Third Man_ couldn't understand why I was chortling gleefully at every other line... -- Andy Perry We search before and after, Brown University We pine for what is not. English Department Our sincerest laughter Andrew_Perry@brown.edu OR With some pain is fraught. st001914@brownvm.bitnet -- Shelley, d'apres Horace Rumpole

1996-05-14 00:00:00 - Re: Oh dear: "Marathon" - (puddintame@aol.com)


In article <4n5lin$fbn@freenet-news.carleton.ca>, ai448@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (Kevin Mason) writes: > it's >hard to believe that it was an episode of the same series that gave us Zero >Minus Ten the week before. I can understand that any show will have its >highs and lows, but I didn't expect Nowhere Man to hit this deep a valley >after such a pronounced peak the week before. Well, maybe if you look upon it as adding to the variety of the types of episodes we've seen it might be easier to digest. From the promo I was expecting a cloak and dagger thriller and that's pretty much what they delivered. I felt the unveiling of the Hidden Agenda photo was suspenseful enough. Given the subject matter of this show, such a valley(your words) seemed somewhat inevitable to me. True, it didn't seem like a complete episode, Tom's relationship with Jenny might have been better explored but then again they were racing against time. The last scene had "to be continued" written all over it. Perhaps it is best to withhold judgment on "Bed of Lies" until after we have seen "Exposed" I think we on the newsgroup/mailing list deserve to pat ourselves on the back. The unraveling plot seems to involve teh deaths of Senators and Tom's involvement with same. While these were always just areas of speculation, remember you heard it here first! :)

1996-05-14 00:00:00 - Re: Oh dear: "Marathon" - (puddintame@aol.com)


In article <4n6p5l$qsn@newsbf02.news.aol.com>, chrgrfan@aol.com (ChrgrFan) writes: >Well, I saw "Marathon" on Friday as well, and I'd have to disagree. I >liked "Zero Minus Ten" quite a bit, and was just as enthralled as everyone >else with "Through a Lens Darkly". But yes, I admit, I want to know >what's behind this whole ordeal. Is that really so wrong? Can't I like >both types of episodes? I mean, lately, all I've read is how you're >either into the "get into TV's mind" eps, or you're a "clue-head", but >never in-between. I like this show for both aspects, and possibly because >it can do both well on a regular basis. I liked "Marathon", and am not >ashamed to say it. In fact, if the series is to end as it appears it >will, these last 2 episodes are about as close as we're gonna get to a >sense of closure, and I for one will happy to see them. Don't let the "Us and Them" types get you down.

1996-05-16 00:00:00 - Re: Oh dear: "Marathon" - (George Holt <geoholt@ix.netcom.com>)


chrgrfan@aol.com (ChrgrFan) wrote: >Well, I saw "Marathon" on Friday as well, and I'd have to disagree. I >liked "Zero Minus Ten" quite a bit, and was just as enthralled as everyone >else with "Through a Lens Darkly". But yes, I admit, I want to know >what's behind this whole ordeal. Is that really so wrong? Can't I like >both types of episodes? I probably would have liked this episode better if it hadn't reminded me of the jokey plot in "Naked Gun." I just couldn't get that out of my mind... --------- Karen Kimball (posting from husband's account)

1996-05-16 00:00:00 - Re: Oh dear: "Marathon" - ("Joe M." <jtmalt@voicenet.com>)


> I probably would have liked this episode better if it hadn't > reminded me of the jokey plot in "Naked Gun." I just couldn't get > that out of my mind... > > --------- > Karen Kimball > (posting from husband's account) Funny you should mention that. The first half of this episode seemed like a carbon copy of "Three Days of the Condor" to me! Joe M.

1996-05-18 00:00:00 - Re: Oh dear: "Marathon" - (jpalonus@halcyon.com)


On 16 May 1996 02:47:32 GMT, George Holt <geoholt@ix.netcom.com> wrote: > I probably would have liked this episode better if it hadn't >reminded me of the jokey plot in "Naked Gun." I just couldn't get >that out of my mind... "Naked Gun"? No - "Telefon" (Charles Bronson & Lee Remick). 197-something. Also the "hit" on Heritage House is straight from "Three Days of the Condor". As they say, if you must copy, copy from the best! Jenny