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1996-12-07 00:00:00 - "State of the Art" (Spoilers) - (kaberi19@starnetinc.com)


When Sliders moved from Vancouver to Los Angeles, I didn't think it was a particularly big deal. Sure, the scenery from British Columbia was great, and perhaps it approximated San Francisco more than southern California did, but I wasn't going to be a stickler about it. And I'm still not...exactly. But I did notice that the beginning scene of "State of the Art" could just as easily have been taken from "Rules of the Game". It was one thing when the set of "Desert Storm" was virtually identical to several minutes from "Electric Twister Acid Test", but when a person such as myself, normally blind to details like set design, starts to notice how similar some episodes look, it's time to find a new place to shoot, guys. This episode was slightly better than average. It wasn't exactly Asimov, but at least it was closer to science fiction than it was to fantasy. It was only "alternative history" in the most general sense, since it, like "The Dream Masters, suggested that the historical change came, not from the alteration of some event that we are familiar with, but from the ramifications of an invention that we have very little knowledge of. I liked the scene with Quinn telling Rembrandt how important he's been, and the second one with Wade and the Professor was OK, but the whole issue of Wade somehow "bonding" with DERIC seemed wrong to me somehow. I can't say I predicted the ending, but when it happened I said to myself, "Oh, of course, it would turn out that way. These kinds of stories always do." One nitpick: when the "robot police" came around for the second time and went after Quinn and Rembrandt, why didn't they just play dead? Wouldn't the police have looked for "signs of life" and then left them alone when they didn't find any? Oh well. On the whole, not an episode I particularly liked, but, like most of this season, not a whole lot I have against it either. My score: 8.0 out of 10.0. -- _______________________/--\_________ /|\ | / /| /| | / | \ | / / | / | | \ | | \ \ | \ | | \| | \ \| \| | *

1996-12-07 00:00:00 - Re: "State of the Art" (Spoilers) - (Seth Argabright <sa228595@oak.cats.ohiou.edu>)


On Sat, 7 Dec 1996, Kaberi Chakrabarty wrote: > When Sliders moved from Vancouver to Los Angeles, I didn't think it was a > particularly big deal. Sure, the scenery from British Columbia was great, > and perhaps it approximated San Francisco more than southern California Isn't that ironic? Canada is more like California than California is. --Seth

1996-12-08 00:00:00 - What Are Little Sliders Made Of? - (misaelf@ix.netcom.com)


Did anybody else notice the similarities between this episode and the classic Star Trek episode, "What Are Little Girls Made Of?" Sure, it wasn't a word for word rip-off, but the whole idea of transplanting minds into robots and the ending in which the seemingly human mastermind behind the whole thing ends up being a robot himself is pretty similar.

1996-12-08 00:00:00 - Re: "State of the Art" (Spoilers) - (hmcom@eskimo.com)


kaberi19@starnetinc.com (Kaberi Chakrabarty) writes: >When Sliders moved from Vancouver to Los Angeles, I didn't think it was a >particularly big deal. Sure, the scenery from British Columbia was great, >and perhaps it approximated San Francisco more than southern California >did, but I wasn't going to be a stickler about it. And I'm still >not...exactly. >But I did notice that the beginning scene of "State of the Art" could just >as easily have been taken from "Rules of the Game". It was one thing >when the set of "Desert Storm" was virtually identical to several minutes >from "Electric Twister Acid Test", but when a person such as myself, >normally blind to details like set design, starts to notice how similar >some episodes look, it's time to find a new place to shoot, guys. >This episode was slightly better than average. It wasn't exactly Asimov, >but at least it was closer to science fiction than it was to fantasy. It >was only "alternative history" in the most general sense, since it, like >"The Dream Masters, suggested that the historical change came, not from >the alteration of some event that we are familiar with, but from the >ramifications of an invention that we have very little knowledge of. I >liked the scene with Quinn telling Rembrandt how important he's been, and >the second one with Wade and the Professor was OK, but the whole issue of >Wade somehow "bonding" with DERIC seemed wrong to me somehow. It was improbable. She would have to be *real* lonely. I also find it improbable that the whole of humanity could have been wiped out by the robots. The fact Wade and the professor were able to be around two of the earlier models for so long without trouble looks to me to mean that if one didn't look for trouble with them/ interact they would be left alone. Ie: humans who went off and built their own new town down the road from the old city wouldn't have anything to worry about. -McDaniel

1996-12-08 00:00:00 - Re: "State of the Art" (Spoilers) - (kaberi19@starnetinc.com)


In article <Pine.OSF.3.93.961207143141.15391C-100000@oak.cats.ohiou.edu>, Seth Argabright <sa228595@oak.cats.ohiou.edu> wrote: > On Sat, 7 Dec 1996, Kaberi Chakrabarty wrote: > > > When Sliders moved from Vancouver to Los Angeles, I didn't think it was a > > particularly big deal. Sure, the scenery from British Columbia was great, > > and perhaps it approximated San Francisco more than southern California > > Isn't that ironic? Canada is more like California than California is. > > --Seth Enh. Not much more ironic than suggesting that Manitoba, for example, is more like Montana than, say, Arizona is. It all depends on where you draw the lines. -- _______________________/--\_________ /|\ | / /| /| | / | \ | / / | / | | \ | | \ \ | \ | | \| | \ \| \| | *