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1999-12-20 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (arlie88@aol.comNoSpam)


Pretty interesting story! But *way* too much Chuckles and not enough Harry. :-) And hardly any Tom at all.... -- Arlie

1999-12-20 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (jwelch7208@aol.comSpamACK)


::sniff:: I miss DM..:( This was good BTW..and to paramounts lawyers<sarcasm begins>...great going..<SARCASM Ended>

1999-12-20 00:00:00 - A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Citizen G'Kar <Narns@bluelily28.freeserve.co.uk>)


As a Christmas treat to those interested, DM has given his permission for me to post the outline for his VOyager novel. This was pitched to John Ordover, who liked it, but the deal got nixed because part of Pocket's contract with Paramount says that he's not allowed to work with anyone who wrote an unlicenced book. Even if it is basically video reviews of the series. Anyway, here's the untitled synopsis, and readers of Dr Who books might notice something familiar that would probably have got DM lynched at a convention... A woman flees a complex, with guards in pursuit, and gets away by the skin of her teeth. Once free, it becomes clear she has a child with her- has she abducted it? Voyager is pursuing a small ship. It's doesn't matter whether it's local or a trader visiting the region. It's clear, however, that Voyager is in no trouble here- there's not a scratch on her, nor is she firing weapons. On the bridge, Janeway is in a firm mood, determined to bring the other ship to a halt. The other ship is rogue, out of control, and she wants to bring it out of warp before it destroys itself, so she can see if the crew need help. A tractor beam and a tachyon blast do the job, and an Away Team beams over. B'Elanna and Harry deal with the ship's overloading engines, while the Doctor treats the injured crew. They're humanoid, with the usual bumpy foreheads. The ship has an FTL drive, but not warp propulsion. The crew agree to let Voyager escort them home to the nearby planet of Cotoss, pointing out that they will be welcome to trade for provisions there. Cotoss is a fairly ordinary Trek style planet - lots of Mediterranean open-plan buildings and pastel colours. The sensors show that the planet has matter/antimatter technology and replicators, but no transporters. Janeway and Neelix lead teams to meet the people and seek supplies. Neelix is interrupted in his search by the woman from the beginning, who asks for asylum for her child - the one she removed from the Centre. Neelix is unsure about this, protocol fighting his instinct to help, until the security forces show up on her tail, demanding her child. They don't even bother to suggest it isn't hers. Neelix decides he has no option- he beams back to Voyager with the child as the woman is killed. The local governments brings Janeway in for an audience. They don't demand the child back (as far as they're concerned, so long as it's out of the way that's all that matters) but they do warn her against interfering. Bynns, the representative of the Corporation that owns the Children's Centre, is furious, and knows that his boss will be too. He wanted the governors to insist on the child's return, but the vote went against him. He contacts Koschei, a man who projects an image of bluster, but is actually subtle and calculating behind it. Koschei is intrigued and angers, but waves away the single child. More important, he says, is the fact that the vote proves the Corporation's influence on the government is decreasing. An adjustment or two will have to be made... A couple of the governors who voted against the Corporation's yes-men take Janeway aside. She's pretty keen to get back and demand to know what the hell Neelix thinks he's doing, but they get their explanation in first. On Cotoss, only one child is allowed per family. Male children are more highly valued, and so if a couple have a daughter first, they will often give her up to the to Children's Centres like the one at the beginning, which we'll see more of later, rather than risk losing a son. Even if they have children from before this practice became common a few years ago, they are still expected to give one up if they want to have another. This isn't exactly a state law, but it is a cultural expectation which is pretty much an unofficial law, after spreading across the world from one region. Of course, some parents will have hidden their extra kids, so they might be several years old before being found. The Centres are privately-owned and run, and from there the abandoned children disappear - with the tacit approval of a government that turns a blind eye. Nobody knows what happens to them, and some think they may be secretly killed. Janeway is sympathetic, as is the rest of the crew when they hear about it. She doesn't chew Neelix out after all - under the circumstances, he could hardly have left the child to be killed too. Witnesses who saw what happened with Neelix, and one of the governors, view Voyager as a possible ark - a way to dump their daughters or second sons into hands which will look after them, rather than entrust them to the Centres which may kill them. Before long, half a dozen children have been pushed into the hands of surface parties. Janeway is forced to stop sending people down to trade because of this. Each child has a note or recording begging asylum for the child. When Bynns hears of this he manages to get the local security chief in his pocket to clamp down. Koschei is also enraged. Those children are valuable and he wants them back. He tells Bynns that he will be arriving shortly. Aboard Voyager, something is making the abandoned children ill, but the Doctor can find no signs of a viral infection or bacteria. B'Elanna is horrified when a couple of them collapse during a tour of the ship- they just keel over when they reach Engineering. The foremost of the anti-Corporation governors is due to meet with Janeway again, but Bynns is waiting. Though ordered only to redress the balance of governors, he thinks offing Janeway as well will please his superiors. He gets the assassination half-right: the governor is killed but Janeway escapes, in a death-defying chase. The Doctor has taken readings of the unconscious orphans who collapsed in Engineering, and discovered that the electrical balance of their brains and nervous systems are being disrupted by an outside force - which a consultation with B'Elanna confirms is the ship's warp field. The mere fact of the warp core being active is enough to make them unwell, and an actual warp travel would disrupt their neurons severely enough to kill them. Janeway isn't best pleased at this news- she can't just send them back to certain death (or a fate worse than), but nor can she accept them - doing so would psychologically harm them, and there's the problem with the warp field affecting them. It also means the ship must stay in orbit until a solution is found to the problem of these children. Chakotay and Tuvok visit the surface, and infiltrate the capital's Children's Centre. It many ways it resembles a High School, with playing fields and libraries... But the forcefields, electrified razorwire, guard towers and heavily armed patrols make it equally reminiscent of a concentration camp. Inside, Tuvok and Chakotay find that that the orphans are not ill-treated, but nor are they particularly well-treated. For the most part, they're basically treated as a living commodity, like farm animals. They are treated coldly, as nothing more than cargo, albeit cargo that's relatively fragile and mustn't be damaged. To Chakotay, it reminds him of not just concentration camps, but the sort of processing centres the Cardassians used in the occupations of planets such as Bajor- one of the reasons the man of peace felt able to use violence in the Maquis to start with. The Centre physically adjoins a heavily guarded part of the spaceport, and there is a private gateway between them. A ship, clearly warp-capable and therefore alien, is parked in this area. It's an odd-looking ship, being partly organic as well as mechanical. It's like what you'd get if Tin Man was assimilated by the Borg. As Chakotay and Tuvok dodge the Centre's guards, they observe groups of Cotossota children being ushered aboard. Tuvok is forced to admit that the setup is logical and efficient as a staging post for loading the orphans onto ships at the adjoining spaceport, but as a father he confesses that his logic would perhaps falter if his own children were ever to end up in such a place (and by falter, he means the Vulcan equivalent of "get very pissed off".) Under Chakotay's instructions, Tuvok manages to slip a tracing device aboard the alien ship. When one of the orphans catch a glimpse of the two Voyager officers, she's frightened, thinking they have something to do with what's going to happen to her. Her screams and protests alert the guards. With their cover blown, Chakotay and Tuvok need to get out of the Centre before they can be beamed back to the ship. Chakotay doesn't make it. Tuvok tries to go back for him, unwilling to leave a shipmate behind, but is forced to acknowledge the logic when Chakotay orders him to save himself - one of them has to get back to the ship with their discovery, or the mission has been for nothing. Tuvok returns to Voyager to make his report, and track the alien ship. It takes off from Cotoss, and is soon out of regular sensor range. However, with the aid of the tracking device and the Astrometrics lab, Seven is able to trace the ship to the Itii'pah'Re system, less than a dozen light years away. Seven recognises the inhabitants as Species 3112. Chakotay has been given a good kicking by the enthusiastic guards (who, like all Fascist Bully-Boys [TM], enjoy that sort of thing), who ask him only the most basic questions, none of which are any use anyway. He then receives a visitor- Koschei. Koschei is not happy at this alien interference in his highly profitable and (to him) amusing business interest in this sector. He's also annoyed at Bynns trying to think for himself too much - the attempt on Janeway's life could, in Koschei's opinion merely attract more interference from these unknown aliens. He kills Bynns as an example to the rest of the staff, and decides that at least Janeway will make a good scapegoat for the governor's murder. Janeway decides to make a two-pronged reconnaissance mission. First Harry will reprogram the Doctor's physical appearance to resemble an older Cotossota child (sparking much ribbing of the Doc from the rest of the crew - even Tuvok compares him unfavourably to well-behaved Vulcan children). He is then slipped into the Centre to join the next batch of orphans to find out what happens to them. As a hologram, he can't really be harmed, and it's unlikely that the children are being transported all the way across a dozen light years just to be killed. Meanwhile, keeping a lock on the Doctor's combadge, Tuvok will take the Delta Flyer (with Tom as pilot, plus Seven and a Cotossota governor) to pace the Corporate ship for the journey. Janeway is contacted by the remaining governors, to discuss the distressing murder. Their invitation is a trap by the security forces, who arrest her for a public inquiry. The governors bail her out, but conditions of the bail preclude her from leaving the capital. Leaving, however, was not her plan... Koschei interrogates Chakotay to learn about Janeway's tactics, how she thinks... All his performance bluster is gone - this is serious business. Chakotay resists, but eventually is broken, the information plucked directly from samples of his RNA - all they had to had to do was make him think about it, and it would all be coded in his genetic memory - which can then be extracted and implanted into Koschei, giving him all Chakotay's insights, at least for a while. Koschei realises that Janeway will use the inquiry and bail to seek evidence about what is really going on. He also works out that she might send a shuttle to Itii'pah'Re, and notifies the arrivals centre there just in case. The abandoned children are settling in to varying degrees, and have been welcomed aboard by Naomi Wildman. B'Elanna is in two minds about them, while Seven reluctantly tolerates them. Janeway is told of Bynns' death, and remembers him from the governing chamber. She asks who he was, and tracks his identity through several cover ID's to the same Corporation that owns the Centres. She and the friendly governors are quite pleased - the deaths of two people from that first government meeting, with Bynns having known that the murdered man spoke to her, can't be a coincidence. Someone is trying to cover their tracks, and she's going to make sure they fail. The Doctor is not having an easy time of it on the Corporation transport. The other kids resent his smarminess, and of course they don't recognise him as an adult, so there is lots of conflict. Some respond by bullying him, and others by ignoring him, and still others try to befriend him. All of this is a new experience for the Doctor, and he doesn't really know how to handle it. He was activated as a replica of a full adult- he never was a child and has no idea how to be one. Frankly, he wonders how humanoid children can ever go through a childhood without going nuts, if what happens to him among the kids is representative... Chakotay overcomes the Corporate guards, and manages to find a communicator. He still can't be beamed out of the complex because of its shields, but Harry is able to talk him through the process of using the Centre's central recycler/replicator to effect a transporter transmission which can beam through shield. Harry must then time his transporter operation precisely, to pull Chakotay the rest of the way through. (Actually it might give Harry more to do if he and Chakotay are both on the Away Team and captured - then he can do the McGyver-type work himself.) When a group of the refugee orphans disappear, B'Elanna leads a shipwide search for them. They've gone into the Jeffries tubes, and, worse still, an intrigued Naomi Wildman has gone with them. Janeway finally meets the visiting Corporate head, Koschei, who tries to buy her off. And even tries to seduce her, perhaps - he can be charming when he wants to. She refuses, and tells him in no uncertain terms that she'll bring him down for all this. He leaves the planet- there's so much profit to count... When B'Elanna finds the kids, rather than drag them back their quarters, she reports in that she has found them, and enlists Naomi's help (as a sort-of member of the crew) to help her stay and keep an eye on them. As B'Elanna's father walked out on her when she was six, she understands how they must feel. At least, she realises, these kids weren't abandoned for lack of care or interest - or even because the parents couldn't handle the family - but to save them from a threat. She makes sure to try to reassure them of that, to ease things when - if - they're re-united with their parents. Janeway wonders if those who are pro-Corporation even know what happens to the children. She asks around, with the aid of Neelix and the locals she has befriended, and discovers that they don't seem to. Some of them are clearly in Koschei's pocket, but even they don't know why the children would be shipped offworld. They insist that the alien vessels bring supplies and go home empty, and that the children are adopted by the government and fostered out to the infertile. Janeway theorises (correctly) that Bynns was killed for his error, and that Koschei probably did it. They've covered their tracks too well, though; it looks like the only way to bring out the truth is to prove to the Cotossota what really happens to the children. The Doctor manages to hold his own, and recognise the good parts of even this unfortunate part of life (being taken away as an abandoned child) to realise why it is that humans often look nostalgically on this stage. He realises that although things seem more restricted, there are also some freedoms that are lost later. The ship eventually lands on the second planet of a system, Itii'pah'Re. Itii'pah'Re is very odd, to say the least. It used to have two small moons, but a tremendous feat of engineering has brought them inwards to be physically fused with the main planet, and hollowed out. As well as providing more open space, the hollowed moons are filled with usable machinery. One provides unlimited geothermal power, and the facilities to convert it to whatever form of energy is required. The other contains all the manufacturing industries. In this way, the natives keep pollution tucked away from the surface atmosphere. The Corporation staff there have also been warned about a possible intruder, and sure enough they detect the Delta Flyer shadowing the transport. Despite Tom's best defensive flying, the Flyer is forced to make an emergency landing. Janeway and Neelix track down the alleged foster parents, and discover that they're all the names of dead people in distant cemeteries. The pair are also able to link Bynns' name to this - proving that the Corporation are falsifying at least some of their documents. A few of the governors begin to waver in their opinions... And the Corporation sends some of the boys round to persuade their bribed governors to stay bribed (by putting guns to their heads, holding them over the railings of high bridges, and so on.) As the Doctor is processed through the arrival area on Itii'pah'Re, he discovers what is happening to the children: To rebuild their population, the Itii'Raan are programming the Cotossota children with their own RNA, giving them memories of being the offspring of a (non-existent) second race native to Itii'pah'Re. As we discover at some point after this, originally this was a charitable idea, but it grew into such a profitable trade that it was kept going by Koschei, the alien third party who ran the transport ships and the processing centres. He's a slaver who will sell anyone to anyone, though the Itii'Raan didn't realise this at first. Their government doesn't actually know the truth either- the Corporation has a jealously-guarded monopoly on space travel to and from Itii'pah'Re, and has told the natives that Cotoss is vastly overpopulated, and that the children will die if they aren't rehoused. So now, the Itii'Raan think that they're being the charitable ones! The Corporation try to capture the crew of the Delta Flyer, but are held off by Tuvok's tactics. The native Itii'Raan security forces get them instead, as Tuvok hadn't anticipated there being two separate forces. When the Doctor is scanned for processing, his true nature is discovered, and all hell breaks loose in the Arrival centre, as the Slavers (and any Itii'Raan who know the truth) realise that the jig is up. The Doctor breaks free, resetting his appearance back to it's default. Although he can do that with one one command, he can't quite do the full disguise programming himself, so he has to settle for the old stand-by of stealing a local uniform and wearing it over his own. With the guards looking for a ten year-old boy, he is able to pass undetected. Tuvok and his party are treated well by the puzzled Itii'Raan authorities. They inform the Itii'Raan of what is really happening, and the Itii'Raan are horrified - with a Cotossota governor there, and Voyager's logs, there can be no doubt that these visitors are telling the truth. The Itii'Raan confront the local Corporate representatives, who at first try to lie. They can't be convincing, though, and soon resort to denying the locals entry to the arrival centre. A fight breaks out, as the Away Team and Itii'Raan force their way in. At the same time, the Doctor is forcing his way out, and between them they defeat the Corporation guards and expose the truth. The Itii'Raan repair the Flyer, and agree to send a delegation to Cotoss, to work out how to handle this situation. Janeway's hearing is due. She and Neelix explain to the governors what they've found about the Corporation's practices, and it's involvement in the murder of the other governor. However, the voting majority have been bribed or coerced by the Corporation, and the outcome is fixed to be against her. Neelix, and the crew of Voyager (watching on the monitors) are concerned, seeing how this is rigged. Hearing the news from Itii'pah'Re, Koschei decides that Voyager must be got rid of, immediately. He has his personal cruiser brought around to confront Voyager. He wants his cargo of children back - even if things aren't recoverable on Itii'pah'Re, there are plenty of other markets, and contracts for the ownership of these kids had been signed... The Delta Flyer returns, pausing to beam the Doctor, Seven and the Itii'Raan delegation to the surface before Tom and Tuvok take their stations on Voyager. Koschei doesn't make it back in time to prevent the Itii'Raan from blowing the lid off his child-slavery operation, but is determined to exact revenge on Voyager, and recover his cargo to start afresh elsewhere. He has too much invested in those children to just write them off. Although the ship is a sitting duck with rooms full of children, and no warp field, Chakotay is determined not to let these children be reprogrammed like automatons. He orders the shields and weapons powered up, and fights Bynns' ship. He manages to hold his own, but it's pretty clear that Koschei's cruiser will wear down Voyager first. While being ferried back by the Delta Flyer, the Doctor and Seven figure that they can use Seven's nanoprobes to reverse the Itii'Raan RNA grafts carried out in the past few months, and at least restore some of the stolen Cotossota children. With the warp core repowered to provide phaser power, the orphans are getting unwell again. Worse still, there are weapon impacts nearby - toxic gas leaks, fire, even a hull breach. As the battle continues, B'Elanna tries to lead them to safety, but they're completely cut off by damage. The only way to safety is a conduit that passes through Engineering and emerges at the top of the warp core (where the 8472 jumped B'Elanna from in Prey). B'Elanna hesitates, but the kids are brave enough to insist on going that way- if they don't they're screwed anyway, and they've learned to trust this crew to make sure they're OK. They go, and all the Cotossota collapse, but are carried out by the Engineering crew. The Doctor gets to work right away - and with an improved child-friendly bedside manner, after his experience. Meanwhile, Janeway gets back in the Delta Flyer. She needs B'Elanna to generate a separate dampening field to prevent transports... Janeway reasons that Koschei's cold opinion of the kids as merely a profitable cargo can be used against him. Outgunned, she lowers the shields, gambling that he will baulk at destroying the valuable merchandise he wants back. She knows that the dampening field B'Elanna is generating will prevent the enemy from beaming anyone to or from Voyager. Koschei is taken aback by the dropping of the shields, and tries to beam the orphans off Voyager rather than risk destroying his stock by blasting the helpless ship. In the few moments during which he's not shooting, Tuvok can accurately take out the enemy ship's weapons. Though the transporter dampening field prevents the Itii'Raan ship from using its transporter, the fact that they had to drop their shields too allows Harry to beam Tuvok's security teams aboard. The battle to take the cruiser is fierce and bloody, but short. Koschei is taken for trial, while his Corporation disintegrates, his underlings fighting each other for control of a company they can restart somewhere else. The governors are still undecided on the one-child policy, but the Cotossota and Itii'Raan at least agree to help each other openly, so that they both know what's going on. At least this way children will still be themselves. The orphans on Voyager are returned to the planet, to be properly cared for. Voyager gets the supplies that were needed, and leaves, continuing on its journey home. -- -- "Oh, go away. Repress someone else."

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Citizen G'Kar <Narns@bluelily28.freeserve.co.uk>)


Steve Christianson <stevechristianson@yahoo.com> wrote > > My question with these unlicensed books is how the authors get the > necessary artwork to snazz it up. Pics of Voyager, the crew, etc., make > for nice eye candy and would IMO help increase sales. Thing is, I doubt > Paramount would give permissions for such artwork, so any such books > must be just dry text, yes? Yes, but in the case of a normal sized paperback that doesn't matter. > > It has to be obeyed because although not officially a State law it's > > unofficially one. > > > Sounds a bit like Southern cops enforcing "Jim Crow" during the days of > segregration. Yes, there may have been no law on the books saying blacks > couldn't march on Selma, but you better believe the local sheriffs took > a dim view of the idea. Exactly > > For example, very few people know that in the UK and US, > > Juries have a right to acquit a guilty defendant if they so choose - but > > the legal system hides this and has made it de facto law that you can't. > > > Um, not true, at least in the US. You're referring to "jury > nullification", which has been greatly curtailed in modern times. Ahem: 4th Circuit Court of Appe\ls, US vs Moylan (1969) Law And Contemporary Problems, vol 43, No. 4 (1980) Though I bow to others' knowledge if this has changed in the past year or two. > > > Likewise in the US, there's no actual law that says you have to pay income > > taxes (this is true, believe it or not, though there are many later laws > > relating to how it ought to be paid), but the system ensures that it's a de > > facto law heavily enforced. > > > Sorry, again, not true. :-) There are very specific provisions of the > Internal Revenue Code which criminalize the nonpayment of taxes. It's > also a criminal offense to not file a return, even if you don't owe any > taxes at all. Ah, but this is de facto law and not a de jure one - the IRS is actually a private corporation, and there isn't a law that specifically states that they must be coo-operated with (though there are as you say plenty that insist you file a file Federal tax return... How you're supposed to file a return without co-operating with the IRS is another matter entirely) and certainly Philip Marsh spent 8 years searching for such a de jure law and didn't find one. (unless of course, he was talking bollocks in his expose, which is certainly possible.) -- -- "Oh, go away. Repress someone else."

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Citizen G'Kar <Narns@bluelily28.freeserve.co.uk>)


Shammie <shamtrek@aol.compizzagrl> wrote in article <19991221130811.26006.00000424@ng-fp1.aol.com>... > > "Citizen G'Kar" wrote: > > >> But not a bad vehicle for Tuvok. > > > >Funny that, isn't it? > > I don't get it. The way you wrote Tuv....er....the way DM wrote Tuvok seemed to > flow easily, so so much for the theory that his character is hard to write for! Indeed... > [whispering: nice to see you, btw!] We persecuted writers must show solidarity- the death of ideas and dreams is something that must always be fought against to the bitter end. -- -- "Oh, go away. Repress someone else."

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - ("EvilBill[AGQx]" <evilbill.DIE-SPAM-DIE@nutter.swinternet.co.uk>)


"Citizen G'Kar" <Narns@bluelily28.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message... > > We persecuted writers must show solidarity- the death of ideas and dreams > is something that must always be fought against to the bitter end. > As your namesake once said: "Greater than the death of flesh is the death of hope, the death of dreams. Against this peril we can never surrender." :-) -- Sisko: "Do you really want to give up your life for the order of things?" Remata'Klan: "It is not my life to give up, Captain, and it never was." EvilBill's home page: http://members.xoom.com/_XOOM/EvilBill/index.html; ICQ number: 37464244 Remove .DIE-SPAM-DIE from my email address to respond. Get paid to surf the web: http://www.alladvantage.com/join.asp?refid=dtd-950

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Robrey <robrey@mailbag.com>)


Steve Christianson wrote: > > X-No-Archive: yes > > Citizen G'Kar wrote: > > > > Robrey <robrey@mailbag.com> wrote [snip] > > For example, very few people know that in the UK and US, > > Juries have a right to acquit a guilty defendant if they so choose - but > > the legal system hides this and has made it de facto law that you can't. > > Um, not true, at least in the US. You're referring to "jury > nullification", which has been greatly curtailed in modern times. > I think you're right here, Steve. I know some Cro-Magnon Right Wingers, and their primary goal is repealing the Sixteenth Amendment of the Constitution that would make the Income Tax illegal....as it was at the founding. > > Likewise in the US, there's no actual law that says you have to pay income > > taxes (this is true, believe it or not, though there are many later laws > > relating to how it ought to be paid), but the system ensures that it's a de > > facto law heavily enforced. > > Sorry, again, not true. :-) There are very specific provisions of the > Internal Revenue Code which criminalize the nonpayment of taxes. It's > also a criminal offense to not file a return, even if you don't owe any > taxes at all. I think you're right here too, Steve. That's the reason we want to do away with the IRS. Though I suspect we wouldn't oppose a tax plan that determined that only liberals should pay taxes, as they're the only one's silly enough to believe that only good comes from the government. Poetic justice in my view... <EG> Cordially, Robrey -- "It is not the critic who counts, not the one who points out how the strong man stumbled or how the doer of deeds might have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred with sweat and dust and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and spends himself in a worthy cause; and who, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat" --Theodore Roosevelt, 1899

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Robrey <robrey@mailbag.com>)


Julianna Feigl wrote: > > Arlie wrote: > > > > Pretty interesting story! > > > > But *way* too much Chuckles > > that's apparently a prerequisite if you want a story to get published... > > > and not enough Harry. :-) > > :-( > > > And hardly any Tom at all.... > > that's the part I like! :-) > :::SPANK:::: Sardonically, Robrey -- "It is not the critic who counts, not the one who points out how the strong man stumbled or how the doer of deeds might have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred with sweat and dust and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and spends himself in a worthy cause; and who, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat" --Theodore Roosevelt, 1899

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (shamtrek@aol.compizzagrl)


> "Citizen G'Kar" wrote: >> But not a bad vehicle for Tuvok. > >Funny that, isn't it? I don't get it. The way you wrote Tuv....er....the way DM wrote Tuvok seemed to flow easily, so so much for the theory that his character is hard to write for! [whispering: nice to see you, btw!]

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (BTS <deletethisbstevens@usxchange.net>)


Citizen G'Kar <Narns@bluelily28.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in article > As a Christmas treat to those interested, DM has given his permission for > me to post the outline for his VOyager novel. This was pitched to John > Ordover, who liked it, but the deal got nixed because part of Pocket's > contract with Paramount says that he's not allowed to work with anyone who > wrote an unlicenced book. Even if it is basically video reviews of the > series. <snip story> Cool story. I thank you Citizen, for presenting us with a taste of DM's work.<g> Tuvok rocks and Chuckles gets tortured. What more could a guy ask for (and still avoid an NC-17 rating)? -- later... b.t.s. occassionally, I'm callous and strange - btvs

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Julianna Feigl <glacierqueen@hotmail.com>)


Arlie wrote: > > Pretty interesting story! > > But *way* too much Chuckles that's apparently a prerequisite if you want a story to get published... > and not enough Harry. :-) :-( > And hardly any Tom at all.... that's the part I like! :-) Julianna -------- Tuvok: The main reason to watch Voyager!

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Julianna Feigl <glacierqueen@hotmail.com>)


Citizen G'Kar wrote: > > Arlie <arlie88@aol.comNoSpam> wrote in article > <19991220172020.14518.00000476@ng-ba1.aol.com>... > > Pretty interesting story! > > > > But *way* too much Chuckles and not enough Harry. :-) > > But it's Chuckles getting tortured - it's worth it for that... as painfully as possible! :-) > > And hardly any Tom at all.... > > Ah, but the trick is to think of something new... And interesting ROTFLOL!!!!! Julianna -------- Tuvok: The main reason to watch Voyager!

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Julianna Feigl <glacierqueen@hotmail.com>)


Shammie wrote: > > >(Arlie) wrote: > > >Pretty interesting story! > > Yes! > >But *way* too much Chuckles and not enough Harry. :-) > > > >And hardly any Tom at all.... > > > > But not a bad vehicle for Tuvok. which shows that it *can* be done.... if somebody *tries*... Julianna -------- Tuvok: The main reason to watch Voyager!

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Robrey <robrey@mailbag.com>)


Citizen G'Kar wrote: > > As a Christmas treat to those interested, DM has given his permission for > me to post the outline for his VOyager novel. This was pitched to John > Ordover, who liked it, but the deal got nixed because part of Pocket's > contract with Paramount says that he's not allowed to work with anyone who > wrote an unlicenced book. Even if it is basically video reviews of the > series. > So it's Pocket Books that objected? This would have made an excellent ep, any hope on that front? I see Chakotay gets the crud kicked out of him, is this the fate you had planned for him in your spec script, DM? <G> By the way, any word on that? > Anyway, here's the untitled synopsis, and readers of Dr Who books might > notice something familiar that would probably have got DM lynched at a > convention... [snip synopsis] An fine story, poignant and timely. There are a couple of levels I saw to this: China's One Child Policy that is causing major trauma to that culture. The Eastern European refugee situation, And of course the slavery aspect. One thing that bugged me, was if it wasn't a state law, why do security forces kill people for disobeying it? And with no law, why would parents bother with it? Cordially, Robrey -- "It is not the critic who counts, not the one who points out how the strong man stumbled or how the doer of deeds might have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred with sweat and dust and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and spends himself in a worthy cause; and who, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat" --Theodore Roosevelt, 1899

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Citizen G'Kar <Narns@bluelily28.freeserve.co.uk>)


Robrey <robrey@mailbag.com> wrote > > > So it's Pocket Books that objected? Not exactly - it's part of their licence with Paramount. Both sets of lawyers probably collaborated to make it up. > This would have made an excellent > ep, any hope on that front? I see Chakotay gets the crud kicked out of > him, is this the fate you had planned for him in your spec script, DM? Who? > <G> By the way, any word on that? Been too busy to write one. Er, DM has been to busy, I mean. > An fine story, poignant and timely. There are a couple of levels I saw > to this: China's One Child Policy that is causing major trauma to that > culture. The Eastern European refugee situation, And of course the > slavery aspect. One thing that bugged me, was if it wasn't a state law, > why do security forces kill people for disobeying it? And with no law, > why would parents bother with it? It has to be obeyed because although not officially a State law it's unofficially one. For example, very few people know that in the UK and US, Juries have a right to acquit a guilty defendant if they so choose - but the legal system hides this and has made it de facto law that you can't. Likewise in the US, there's no actual law that says you have to pay income taxes (this is true, believe it or not, though there are many later laws relating to how it ought to be paid), but the system ensures that it's a de facto law heavily enforced. As for why parents would both- cultural indoctrination. These are things that inevitably are glossed over in a synopsis, but would be clear in a finished text. -- -- "Oh, go away. Repress someone else."

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Citizen G'Kar <Narns@bluelily28.freeserve.co.uk>)


Arlie <arlie88@aol.comNoSpam> wrote in article <19991220172020.14518.00000476@ng-ba1.aol.com>... > Pretty interesting story! > > But *way* too much Chuckles and not enough Harry. :-) But it's Chuckles getting tortured - it's worth it for that... > And hardly any Tom at all.... Ah, but the trick is to think of something new... And interesting

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Citizen G'Kar <Narns@bluelily28.freeserve.co.uk>)


Granular <mcgasper@NOSPAMexecpc.com> wrote in article <385f18b1$0$84817@news.execpc.com>... > It would have been a better movie then "Insurrection", and it's a better > story then 95% of Voyager episodes. > > The only things I didn't like were the Bad Science(TM) use of RNA for Ah, but there's bad science when you don't know what you're doing; and bad science when you do what you're doing, but want to have some fun with something that sounds like it was in the show... > memory, and the Voyager clich��� of Nanoprobes to the Rescue(TM). Only a throwaway bit at the end. > But, with a good story, those type of things can be overlooked. > > Which begs the question, "Why the hell isn't DM a staff writer for > Voyager?" Because he doesn't live in LA for a start... -- -- "Oh, go away. Repress someone else."

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Citizen G'Kar <Narns@bluelily28.freeserve.co.uk>)


Shammie <shamtrek@aol.compizzagrl> wrote > >Pretty interesting story! > > Yes! > >But *way* too much Chuckles and not enough Harry. :-) > > > >And hardly any Tom at all.... > > > > But not a bad vehicle for Tuvok. Funny that, isn't it? -- -- "Oh, go away. Repress someone else."

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (shamtrek@aol.compizzagrl)


>(Arlie) wrote: >Pretty interesting story! Yes! >But *way* too much Chuckles and not enough Harry. :-) > >And hardly any Tom at all.... > But not a bad vehicle for Tuvok.

1999-12-21 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Granular <mcgasper@NOSPAMexecpc.com>)


It would have been a better movie then "Insurrection", and it's a better story then 95% of Voyager episodes. The only things I didn't like were the Bad Science(TM) use of RNA for memory, and the Voyager clich� of Nanoprobes to the Rescue(TM). But, with a good story, those type of things can be overlooked. Which begs the question, "Why the hell isn't DM a staff writer for Voyager?" -- Granular ------------------------------ "Do not taunt Happy Fun Ball."

1999-12-22 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Citizen G'Kar <Narns@bluelily28.freeserve.co.uk>)


EvilBill[AGQx] <evilbill.DIE-SPAM-DIE@nutter.swinternet.co.uk> wrote in article <83p32p$ht5$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk>... > "Citizen G'Kar" <Narns@bluelily28.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message... > > > > We persecuted writers must show solidarity- the death of ideas and dreams > > is something that must always be fought against to the bitter end. > > > > As your namesake once said: "Greater than the death of flesh is the death of > hope, the death of dreams. Against this peril we can never surrender." I have a framed picture of him with that quote on the living room wall... -- -- "Oh, go away. Repress someone else."

1999-12-22 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Citizen G'Kar <Narns@bluelily28.freeserve.co.uk>)


Steve Christianson <stevechristianson@yahoo.com> wrote Obviously I have to stop reading these crypto-anarchist manuals... I'd still query just how watertight the rules against jury nullification are- every country has little technicalities that slipped through which, while not a basis for doing things differently, are amusing little pieces of trivia. Especially since I can quote legal documents supporting jury nullification dating from up to 1980. Shall I add tthe one about assorted Supreme Court Justices (or someone) proving that legally, the Constitution is binding only to those who were actually there to sign it? -- -- "Oh, go away. Repress someone else."

2000-01-09 00:00:00 - Re: A Christmas treat- DM's Voyager novel - (Citizen G'Kar <Narns@bluelily28.freeserve.co.ukNOSPAM>)


Silverhawk <analog-kid@eidosnet.co.uk> wrote in article <84tqk4$1ron$2@quince.news.easynet.net>... > Citizen G'Kar wrote... > >I shall soon be debuting (in costume and makeup) at > >conventions - probably Neutral Zone in March first... > > Is that our Neutral Zone in Newcastle or a different one? That one. Remember Ambassador Mollari, at last year's Summer Party? That's my other half (though I couldn't make it last year) I hasten to add that by "debuting" I mean debuting as G'Kar. The real me has, of course been to many conventions... -- -- "Oh, go away. Repress someone else."