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2000-04-30 00:00:00 - Re: [VOY] Cynics Corner Review: "Muse" - (Terwilliger <burnodo-NODAMSPAM-@onebox.com>)


Given your thoughts here, I'm surprised you haven't completely lost interest. I believe there have been 3 or 4 decent to good quality episodes this season. Would you concur? More or less? I have always taken the quality of Star Trek television as a given. Now, it's as if Trek is produced like a bad copy of cheap sci-fi pulp. I am much less enthused with television watching nowadays, and at the end of watching Voyager week-to-week, I'm left with a "well that was a productive hour" attitude that I rarely got with even the worst episodes of TNG and DS9. sluss@no-square-canned-processed-meat.dhp.com (David E. Sluss) hath spoken thus: >-C Y N I C S >-O >-R Star Trek: Voyager: "Muse" <snip> ICQ: burnodo(34615167) | AOLIM: Eibbor1967 SETI@Home - http://setiathome.berkeley.edu - 41 units completed SETI@Home - Team MajeSETI - 6000+ units completed "We are ALL starstuff." - Carl Sagan

2000-04-30 00:00:00 - [VOY] Cynics Corner Review: "Muse" - (sluss@no-square-canned-processed-meat.dhp.com)


C Y N I C S O R Star Trek: Voyager: "Muse" N as reviewed by David E. Sluss E R copyright (c) 2000 Tiger Bay Publishing Spoilers ahead! THE BOTTOM LINE: An interesting, somewhat subversive episode, best viewed as a meta-fictional indictment of Voyager's own storytelling problems, such as rushed, inexplicable endings, inconsistent characterization, and crude acting. But at least now we can "Bennie Russell-ize" some of Voyager's worst episodes as being plays written by Kellas the Poet. CYNICS CORNER RATING: 8.0 RECYCLING OF THE WEEK: The title, of course, was used just four years ago on DS9 (okay, so it was "_The_ Muse," but close enough). LAUGH LINE OF THE WEEK: "The Eternals are difficult to understand." Yes, the characterization on Voyager _is_ a bit inconsistent, isn't it? ALLEGORIES OF THE WEEK: One of Star Trek's strongest suits is often said to be its use of allegory to address timely issues in an indirect fashion, using sci-fi props to make controversial messages more palatable. The original series, for example, addressed racial intolerance ("Let That Be Your Last Battlefield"), the arms race ("A Private Little War"), and the Hippie Creep threat to American society ("The Way to Eden") in this manner. But this may be the first time that Star Trek has turned the "allegory thing" on itself, and the controversial message here seems to be "Star Trek is crap, and you're a sucker for watching it." All of the symbols are there, if you're willing to look for them. The Old-Timer complains about the New Poets and their reliance on storytelling tricks and manipulation to move an audience, things that are bread and butter on Star Trek in general, and Voyager in particular, for years. The bloated oaf of a Patron (representing Berman? Paramount? Hardcore couch-potato Trekkies? Hard to say.) demands that new episodes be produced, even if they have to be hacked out on short notice. Kellas the Poet (representing Braga, I guess) uses an incredibly half-assed writing process which relies on cliche and deus ex machina endings (and I'd also note for what its worth that Kellas seems to enjoy the company of beautiful women, especially when they are tied up). Kellas and his troupe also seem to represent the fringes of Star Trek fandom, as they play-act Voyager's journeys, create masturbatory fanfic such as the Janeway/Chakotay and Seven/Paris trysts, and genuinely believe that their "play" represents a mindset that can improve the condition of the real world. CONTRIVANCES OF THE WEEK: The Delta Flyer crashes, and yet everything on the ship needed to advance this story, like the library computer and the transporter, still works. And again, like in last week's "Live Fast and Prosper," we see stupidity with regard to the Delta Flyer's computer, like a total lack of security (i.e. Kellas was able to get in even though the most sophisticated machine he'd ever seen is probably an abacus). Also, though it's consistent with last week's properties of the Delta Flyer computer, there's no good reason for Janeway's log, quoted by the Chorus in the teaser, to be there. NEW LINGUISTICS OF THE WEEK: I know, I know, we have to accept the universal translator and its magical powers to instantly translate an unknown language and to know when a speaker intends for his or her language to be heard and then translated verbally (e.g. "I am experiencing Pl'ugh'Da'Rane -- constipation"). Still, I have to make note of Kellas writing a message to Torres in his alien language and Torres being able to read it without difficulty. UT contact lenses, anyone? FILLER OF THE WEEK: Can anyone think of a legitimate purpose for the sub-sub-subplot of Tuvok getting fatigued and ultimately falling asleep, snoring on the bridge? I didn't think so. And while the use of Tuvok as comic relief in this manner is embarrassing on its face, the real tragedy is that Kellas' spot-on description of the Vulcans proves that Voyager's writers know how Tuvok ought to be presented; they just refuse to do it for some reason. PRIME DIRECTIVE VIOLATIONS OF THE WEEK: It seems that Torres using a phaser, showing off the computer, and beaming off-stage in front of these combustible-engine-incapable rubes would be potential violations of the Prime Suggestion (as reviewer "Bozo the Proctologist" likes to call it). But no one seems to worry about that these days. I was actually a bit more disturbed to see Torres forcing her "servant" Kellas to risk his life getting dilithium. It hardly seems like the "Starfleet Way" (or even the "Maquis Way") to let civilians front for her in a life-threatening situation. NEXT WEEK: A special guest star, time travel, and things blowing up? It must be Sweeps, but will it clean up like a good Hoover, or merely suck? -- // David E. Sluss (The Cynic) \\ // "I'm impatient with \\ //_________ sluss%dhp.com _________\\//__ stupidity. My people have __\\ \\ Cynics Corner Interactive //\\ learned to live without it." // \\ http://users.dhp.com/~sluss // \\ Klaatu //

2000-05-01 00:00:00 - Re: [VOY] Cynics Corner Review: "Muse" - (Matthew Leo <matt@acrcorp.removethis.com>)


Spoilers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "David E. Sluss" wrote: > FILLER OF THE WEEK: Can anyone think of a legitimate purpose for the > sub-sub-subplot of Tuvok getting fatigued and ultimately falling > asleep, snoring on the bridge? I didn't think so. And while the use > of Tuvok as comic relief in this manner is embarrassing on its face, > the real tragedy is that Kellas' spot-on description of the Vulcans > proves that Voyager's writers know how Tuvok ought to be presented; > they just refuse to do it for some reason. Well, I don't think you can generalize about "the writers". It's more a matter of the whole show is a bit out of control with respect to character development. Thus an occaisional writer may come up with juicy bit, but that's negated by the next umpteen script whose writers fail to build upon it. I think the point of the incident is to show in a deft humorous way that Tuvok actually cares deeply about Torres and Kim. I'm a little fuzzy on this, but didn't they cut from the scene where Kellas is lecturing the actor on the internal strife of the Vulcan to the Tuvok/Neelix scene? In any case, this was an uncharacteristically deft juxtaposition for Voyager, whose normal way of introducing character motivation is to have one character ask another a contrived question, and to receive a stiff monologue in return. Seldom do we learn character motivation from their actual actions. The scene with Kellas also has some amusing echoes Hamlet's direction of the play-within-a-play. As far as using Tuvok for comic relief, there's nothing embarassing at all. The humor isn't some kind of slapstick thing poking fun at him for falling asleep at his post. The humor is in the laying bare of his pretensions -- that he is not emotionally affected by the loss of Kim and Torres, and that he is not overexerting himself on their part. In other words, like Barklay, he is on the surface being funny, but underneath he's actually being heroic.

2000-05-01 00:00:00 - Re: [VOY] Cynics Corner Review: "Muse" - ("David B." <bothecat@hotmail.com>)


"David E. Sluss" wrote: > > C Y N I C S > O > R Star Trek: Voyager: "Muse" > N as reviewed by David E. Sluss > E > R copyright (c) 2000 Tiger Bay Publishing > NEXT WEEK: A special guest star, time travel, and things blowing up? > It must be Sweeps, but will it clean up like a good Hoover, or merely > suck? LOL. I'll be thinking of that while I watch the episode...

2000-05-03 00:00:00 - Re: [VOY] Cynics Corner Review: "Muse" - ("EvilBill[AGQx]" <evilbill25REMOVE-THIS@freeuk.com>)


"William December Starr" <wdstarr@panix.com> wrote in message news:8eohi8 > In article <8eoc43$tkf$1@nnrp1.deja.com>, > berli@my-deja.com said: > > > At this point, I've gotten inured to Tuvok's . . . many . . . > > failings, but one part of me was still thinking, "all those times > > Spock went without sleep, he never fell asleep at his post." Spock > > would have died first! I don't think Kirk ever fell asleep at his post > > either, even all those times he was on the bridge while gravely ill. > > I believe he managed it during "The Deadly Years." But that was sort of > a special case, of course, in that the mental faculties that should have > warned him that he was no longer fit for command duty were themselves out > of commission. > Which was their usual state. <eg> -- Hugh: "Resistance is... NOT futile." EvilBill's home page: http://members.xoom.com/EvilBill/ E-mail: evilbill25@freeuk.com. ICQ number: 37464244 Get paid to surf the web: http://www.alladvantage.com/join.asp?refid=dtd-950

2000-05-03 00:00:00 - Re: [VOY] Cynics Corner Review: "Muse" - (Laura <laware@strato.net>)


<berli@my-deja.com> wrote in message news:8epvh2$nno$1@nnrp1.deja.com... > You may be right; I haven't seen that episode in years. But if it did, > it would have been a horrible moment. I do remember Kirk's incoherent > self-defense before the review board (or whatever it was) and Spock's > reaction. Tuvok doesn't look like he's going senile any time soon, > though, so I think we can chalk up his bridge nap to general ineptitude. Oh, c'mon, I think he dozed off for a minute due to exhaustion. Smart? He should not have gone on duty, and probably forced himself out of a sense of duty. But inept? I must respectfully disagree.

2000-05-03 00:00:00 - Re: [VOY] Cynics Corner Review: "Muse" - (Stembolt <Stembolt@austin.rr.combadge>)


<berli@my-deja.com> wrote in message news:8eq048$od0$1@nnrp1.deja.com... > In article <fZWP4.13011$eO5.65335@typhoon.austin.rr.com>, > Thanks for clearing that up. I remember that episode, but I didn't make > the connection. Reminds me of something in the Nitpicker's Guide where > Farrand claims that Data was never rescued in "Brothers," the Enterprise > was destroyed, and that every episode from then on is actually Data's > android dreams. That's interesting. Do you have a URL? > I called myself an ignorama because I thought maybe Bennie Russell was > some real person I should know about. Kind of silly to find out he's a > ST character I already know about. <slaps forehead> I was ribbing you because I believe the word is *ignoramus*, but I would never really call you that. ; ) > Nice .sig ;-) Thanks -- Stembolt "We tend to scoff at the beliefs of the ancients. But we can't scoff at them personally, to their faces, and this is what annoys me." -- Jack Handey

2000-05-03 00:00:00 - Re: [VOY] Cynics Corner Review: "Muse" - (berli@my-deja.com)


In article <fZWP4.13011$eO5.65335@typhoon.austin.rr.com>, "Stembolt" <Stembolt@austin.rr.combadge> wrote: > > <berli@my-deja.com> wrote in message news:8eo9q9$r6b$1@nnrp1.deja.com... > > In article <390c683a.15787782@usenet.pitt.edu>, > > sluss@no-square-canned-processed-meat.dhp.com (David E. Sluss) wrote: > > > C Y N I C S > > > O > > > R Star Trek: Voyager: "Muse" > > > N as reviewed by David E. Sluss > > > E > > > R copyright (c) 2000 Tiger Bay Publishing > > > > > > Spoilers ahead! > > . > >. > ******** Plus newly added DS9 spoilers!!! ****** > > . > > . > > . > > > But at least now we can "Bennie > > > Russell-ize" some of Voyager's worst episodes as being plays written > > > by Kellas the Poet. > > > > Call me an ignorama, but who's Bennie Russell? > > OK, you're an.... *ignorama*?!? Well, I hope you feel better now. Bennie > Russell is from DS9. Sisko has a dream, or vision, or mental breakdown > where he is Bennie Russell, a black sci-fi writer in pre civil-rights > America. I don't remember the exact period, but it was before Jackie > Robinson's breakthrough. Anyway, Bennie wrote about DS9 and Sisko. So, > perhaps Sisko never existed at all. He and the rest of DS9 were just an > invention of Bennie's poor twisted mind. (Bennie starts to believe DS9 is > real... an escape from the racial hatred that is his reality.) > > -- > Stembolt Thanks for clearing that up. I remember that episode, but I didn't make the connection. Reminds me of something in the Nitpicker's Guide where Farrand claims that Data was never rescued in "Brothers," the Enterprise was destroyed, and that every episode from then on is actually Data's android dreams. I called myself an ignorama because I thought maybe Bennie Russell was some real person I should know about. Kind of silly to find out he's a ST character I already know about. <slaps forehead> > "We tend to scoff at the beliefs of the ancients. But we can't scoff at them > personally, to their faces, and this is what annoys me." -- Jack Handey Nice .sig ;-) -berli -- More weirdness at http://members.dencity.com/berli/ -- Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/ Before you buy.

2000-05-03 00:00:00 - Re: [VOY] Cynics Corner Review: "Muse" - (berli@my-deja.com)


In article <8eohi8$qgk$1@panix6.panix.com>, wdstarr@panix.com (William December Starr) wrote: > > Spock went without sleep, he never fell asleep at his post." Spock > > would have died first! I don't think Kirk ever fell asleep at his post > > either, even all those times he was on the bridge while gravely ill. > > I believe he managed it during "The Deadly Years." But that was sort of > a special case, of course, in that the mental faculties that should have > warned him that he was no longer fit for command duty were themselves out > of commission. > You may be right; I haven't seen that episode in years. But if it did, it would have been a horrible moment. I do remember Kirk's incoherent self-defense before the review board (or whatever it was) and Spock's reaction. Tuvok doesn't look like he's going senile any time soon, though, so I think we can chalk up his bridge nap to general ineptitude. -berli Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/ Before you buy.

2000-05-03 00:00:00 - Re: [VOY] Cynics Corner Review: "Muse" - (Stembolt <Stembolt@austin.rr.combadge>)


<berli@my-deja.com> wrote in message news:8eo9q9$r6b$1@nnrp1.deja.com... > In article <390c683a.15787782@usenet.pitt.edu>, > sluss@no-square-canned-processed-meat.dhp.com (David E. Sluss) wrote: > > C Y N I C S > > O > > R Star Trek: Voyager: "Muse" > > N as reviewed by David E. Sluss > > E > > R copyright (c) 2000 Tiger Bay Publishing > > > > Spoilers ahead! > . >. ******** Plus newly added DS9 spoilers!!! ****** > . > . > . > > But at least now we can "Bennie > > Russell-ize" some of Voyager's worst episodes as being plays written > > by Kellas the Poet. > > Call me an ignorama, but who's Bennie Russell? OK, you're an.... *ignorama*?!? Well, I hope you feel better now. Bennie Russell is from DS9. Sisko has a dream, or vision, or mental breakdown where he is Bennie Russell, a black sci-fi writer in pre civil-rights America. I don't remember the exact period, but it was before Jackie Robinson's breakthrough. Anyway, Bennie wrote about DS9 and Sisko. So, perhaps Sisko never existed at all. He and the rest of DS9 were just an invention of Bennie's poor twisted mind. (Bennie starts to believe DS9 is real... an escape from the racial hatred that is his reality.) -- Stembolt "We tend to scoff at the beliefs of the ancients. But we can't scoff at them personally, to their faces, and this is what annoys me." -- Jack Handey

2000-05-03 00:00:00 - Re: [VOY] Cynics Corner Review: "Muse" - (wdstarr@panix.com)


In article <8eoc43$tkf$1@nnrp1.deja.com>, berli@my-deja.com said: > At this point, I've gotten inured to Tuvok's . . . many . . . > failings, but one part of me was still thinking, "all those times > Spock went without sleep, he never fell asleep at his post." Spock > would have died first! I don't think Kirk ever fell asleep at his post > either, even all those times he was on the bridge while gravely ill. I believe he managed it during "The Deadly Years." But that was sort of a special case, of course, in that the mental faculties that should have warned him that he was no longer fit for command duty were themselves out of commission. -- William December Starr <wdstarr@panix.com> <--- new address!

2000-05-03 00:00:00 - Re: [VOY] Cynics Corner Review: "Muse" - (berli@my-deja.com)


In article <390c683a.15787782@usenet.pitt.edu>, sluss@no-square-canned-processed-meat.dhp.com (David E. Sluss) wrote: > C Y N I C S > O > R Star Trek: Voyager: "Muse" > N as reviewed by David E. Sluss > E > R copyright (c) 2000 Tiger Bay Publishing > > Spoilers ahead! . . . . . . > > THE BOTTOM LINE: An interesting, somewhat subversive episode, best > viewed as a meta-fictional indictment of Voyager's own storytelling > problems, such as rushed, inexplicable endings, inconsistent > characterization, and crude acting. I was thinking something similar, except that I was also thinking about how clumsily the whole thing was executed. Kellas was not such a great poet. I mean, there were occasional glimpses of something better, but mostly he sucked. I know I shouldn't, but I'm also tempted to make snide comments about straight playwrights. Yeah, I'm a bigoted cretin. Actually, Kellas' ineptitude says alot about the quality of Voyager writers, don't you think? > But at least now we can "Bennie > Russell-ize" some of Voyager's worst episodes as being plays written > by Kellas the Poet. Call me an ignorama, but who's Bennie Russell? > LAUGH LINE OF THE WEEK: "The Eternals are difficult to understand." > Yes, the characterization on Voyager _is_ a bit inconsistent, isn't > it? You know it's funny. Kirk's first impulse when called a god was to go into the "this is a free and democratic galaxy and we're all equals" spiel. Torres just goes along with it. Then again, who was the conceited ass? > ALLEGORIES OF THE WEEK: <<snip>> But this may be the first time > that Star Trek has turned the "allegory thing" on itself, and the > controversial message here seems to be "Star Trek is crap, and you're > a sucker for watching it." All of the symbols are there, if you're > willing to look for them. The Old-Timer complains about the New Poets > and their reliance on storytelling tricks and manipulation to move an > audience, things that are bread and butter on Star Trek in general, > and Voyager in particular, for years. The bloated oaf of a Patron > (representing Berman? Paramount? Hardcore couch-potato Trekkies? > Hard to say.) demands that new episodes be produced, even if they have > to be hacked out on short notice. Kellas the Poet (representing > Braga, I guess) uses an incredibly half-assed writing process which > relies on cliche and deus ex machina endings (and I'd also note for > what its worth that Kellas seems to enjoy the company of beautiful > women, especially when they are tied up). Funny, the spfx ending created by Torres reminded me more of Shatner's story telling "skills" in Star Trek V, where he tries to resolve a ridiculous plot with a big "movie" scene. Frankly, I couldn't figure out how Torres beaming out of the room was supposed to resolve anything. Besides, weren't they in spitting distance of the town? With the shuttle still trashed and the Jealous Girlfriend(TM) on to them? And Torres draws *attention* to herself? Kellas and his troupe also > seem to represent the fringes of Star Trek fandom, as they play-act > Voyager's journeys, create masturbatory fanfic such as the > Janeway/Chakotay and Seven/Paris trysts, and genuinely believe that > their "play" represents a mindset that can improve the condition of > the real world. Yes, I suspect that the J/C fantasy scene juxtaposed with the "real" J/C was a not-so-subtle way to tell J/Cers to go to hell. It kind of backfires because it accentuates just how arbitrary the whole thing is. Of course Braga, I mean Torres, attempts to justify the love-less boat by claiming that all their battles don't leave any time for love, which was not particularly convincing. And hey, I for one would rather *not* see more sex scenes, a la NextGen. I gagged and turned off the TV every time another woman threw herself at <puke> Riker. But come on, man, 150 people in close quarters for 6 years - only one couple? Give me a break. Hell, convicts in high-security prisons get more ass than the Voyager crew. Oh, and that "change the world with lUv scenes" was such typical Roddenberry crap. Have you read _Harlan Ellison's The City on the Edge of Forever_? Great book. (The people on the excelsior list will probably try to kill me for saying that, but I never liked Roddenberry that much, sorry). Anyway, Ellison's original script absolutely BLEW ME AWAY. I hadn't expected much, since those pernicious anti-Ellison propagandists actually had me believing that Kirk took Keeler with him in the original script. A total lie! Also, "City . . ." got rapped in _Star trek and history : race-ing toward a white future_ by Daniel Leonard Bernardi for the ears in the mechanical rice-picker "joke". Well, Ellison didn't write that. Instead, he showed the reality of the 1930's; anti-foreigner sentiment, mistreatment of immigrant workers - well, hell, that goes on today. He also didn't write that stupid "stone knives and bearskins" line that Nimoy could barely say with a straight face, either. And if you've read the Blish novelization - well, this is twenty times better than that ill-begotten freakish bastard. I mean twenty thousand times better!!! Now it's time for "the rest of the story." Now we find out what REAL futuristic TV could have been like. Now we know that you can't blame the *writers* for the sexism in Classic Trek. Uh-uh. Whew. Enough ranting for one day. > NEW LINGUISTICS OF THE WEEK:<<snip>> Kellas writing a message to Torres in his alien language and > Torres being able to read it without difficulty. UT contact lenses, > anyone? Yeah. I'm surprised you didn't notice something else that ticked me off. Kim claims to have traveled 200 kilometers to get to the delta flyer. Now, at this point, it's been a week since Torres woke up, which I'd assume is 7 days, and she'd been unconscious for 8 days before that (I don't know much biology, but it seemed odd that after eight days under, with bloodletting, she wasn't INCREDIBLY thirsty). Now, that makes 15 days, although you might argue it down to 13. 200 km in 15 nights? Hello? 1 km = .621 mi, 200km = 124.2 mi, 124.2 mi / 15 nights = 8.28 mi/night; the average woman walks about 3mi/hr and the average man walks about 2mi/hr, but let's assume that Kim is in pretty good shape and what with Starfleet training, etc, can walk a womanly 3mi/hr; 8.28 mi / (3mi/hr) = 2.76 hr; now some people can only walk for 15 minutes at a time, but let's assume Starfleet boot camp, etc, let's even assume a 15 minute break (2.76 hr + .25 hr = 3.01 hr): what the hell was Kim doing those other 21 hours of the day??? > PRIME DIRECTIVE VIOLATIONS OF THE WEEK: It seems that Torres using a > phaser, showing off the computer, and beaming off-stage in front of > these combustible-engine-incapable rubes would be potential violations > of the Prime Suggestion (as reviewer "Bozo the Proctologist" likes to > call it). Well I care. I was slightly ticked. But then again, it's hardly in Disaster Kate territory. > I was > actually a bit more disturbed to see Torres forcing her "servant" > Kellas to risk his life getting dilithium. It hardly seems like the > "Starfleet Way" (or even the "Maquis Way") to let civilians front for > her in a life-threatening situation. Uh, he did slash her arm, tie her up, and was conspiring to keep her there against her will. I think this was a case of "you broke the social contract first, so don't even try and stop me now." > NEXT WEEK: A special guest star, time travel, and things blowing up? > It must be Sweeps, but will it clean up like a good Hoover, or merely > suck? :-) Probably the latter, from what I've seen and heard . . . -berli --- Visit Berli's Star Trek Shack at its new home http://hermes.spaceports.com/~theshack/ Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/ Before you buy.

2000-05-03 00:00:00 - Re: [VOY] Cynics Corner Review: "Muse" - (berli@my-deja.com)


In article <390DB27D.8F821DEE@acrcorp.removethis.com>, Matthew Leo <matt@acrcorp.removethis.com> wrote: > Spoilers > . > . > . > . > . > . > . > . > . > . > . > . > . > . > . > . > . > . > . > . > > "David E. Sluss" wrote: > > FILLER OF THE WEEK: Can anyone think of a legitimate purpose for the > > sub-sub-subplot of Tuvok getting fatigued and ultimately falling > > asleep, snoring on the bridge? I didn't think so. And while the use > > of Tuvok as comic relief in this manner is embarrassing on its face, > > the real tragedy is that Kellas' spot-on description of the Vulcans > > proves that Voyager's writers know how Tuvok ought to be presented; > > they just refuse to do it for some reason. > > Well, I don't think you can generalize about "the writers". It's more a > matter of the whole show is a bit out of control with respect to > character development. Thus an occasional writer may come up with > juicy bit, but that's negated by the next umpteen script whose writers > fail to build upon it. Yes, very true. Look at the lack of follow up to Ron Moore's episodes early this season. Also "Riddles." Wait, maybe this is follow-up to "Riddles." "Tuvok appeared to be completely cured . . . but as the months went by, it became clear that everything was not quite right up there . . . slowly, the pieces began to fall apart . . . day by day, Tuvok began a descent into Hell as he gradually lost his control, his dignity and his MIND." Now that's entertainment. > I think the point of the incident is to show in a deft humorous way that > Tuvok actually cares deeply about Torres and Kim. Well, this was puzzling. Just last week he snubs Kim and Paris for screwing with his stuff one too many times. Kim and Tuvok have never gotten along too well, even though Kim sometimes ("Alter Ego") thinks they do. I don't think Tuvok has any shred of respect for Kim whatsoever. I don't think, after seeing "Meld" that Tuvok has much respect for Janeway, either; he's mainly bootlicking, although he did mindmeld with her in "Flashback" which I guess tells you what he thinks of Vorik by comparison. (It's never been clear to me just what is up with Tuvok and Janeway. I've never seen Tuvok do anything that would earn her respect and I don't understand what Janeway could have possibly done for Tuvok to allow her to invade his personal space.) Anyway, my guess is that Tuvok was worried about Torres. I think there is some mutual respect between them, even concern on Tuvok's side, if not Torres'. They both struggle with "dark" sides of themselves (note the slightly annoying racial angle there), and Tuvok seems to get into that "mentor" role even though he's actually a lousy teacher. There was also a hint that he felt responsible as security officer to trace the DF (although in NextGen those sorts of jobs always landed in the lap of engineering - I don't ever remember Worf suggesting ways to track craft). Of course he fails; considering Tuvok's track record, it's hardly surprising. I'm a little fuzzy on > this, but didn't they cut from the scene where Kellas is lecturing the > actor on the internal strife of the Vulcan to the Tuvok/Neelix scene? > In any case, this was an uncharacteristically deft juxtaposition for > Voyager, It wasn't deft, it was incredibly obvious. And there was no counterpoint whatsoever. The A plot and B plot failed to complement each other in any meaningful way, except perhaps that the A' (Torres fixing transmitter) plot and B (Voy seeks DF) plot were seeking a common goal. Even then, Torres does all the work. whose normal way of introducing character motivation is to have > one character ask another a contrived question, and to receive a stiff > monologue in return. Seldom do we learn character motivation from their > actual actions. How is Tuvok conking off on the bridge "action"? Wasn't it funny that Tommy boy looked chipper as ever once he got over that pouting scene in the conference room, but Tuvok looks like he has an "incurable case of . . . psoriasis" developing around his eyes? > As far as using Tuvok for comic relief, there's nothing embarassing at > all. The humor isn't some kind of slapstick thing poking fun at him for > falling asleep at his post. The humor is in the laying bare of his > pretensions -- that he is not emotionally affected by the loss of Kim > and Torres, and that he is not overexerting himself on their part. In > other words, like Barclay, he is on the surface being funny, but > underneath he's actually being heroic. Of course it's embarrassing! Weren't you watching Paris' face? At this point, I've gotten inured to Tuvok's . . . many . . . failings, but one part of me was still thinking, "all those times Spock went without sleep, he never fell asleep at his post." Spock would have died first! I don't think Kirk ever fell asleep at his post either, even all those times he was on the bridge while gravely ill. Okay, so Tuvok ain't no Spock. But I just didn't see the motivation for Tuvok to run himself into the ground. And it seems odd that a big boy of 116+ years wouldn't know his own limits. I guess it's an interesting comment on Star Trek. After years of having every officer we saw be the "best and the brightest" (except for one or two bad apples) now we see a crew where the Starfleet officers are tinplate dictators, self-absorbed, puerile, socially inept, lousy commanders and creeps. Isn't it funny how Torres and Chakotay are more competent and nicer people than all the Starfleet hacks on that ship? (At least the ones in leadership positions and in engineering). I guess all those idiots who couldn't hack it on good ships like the Enterprise have to go somewhere! -berli --- Visit Berli's Star Trek Shack at its new home http://hermes.spaceports.com/~theshack/ Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/ Before you buy.

2000-05-05 00:00:00 - Kim fritters away 21 hours a day when his CO isn't looking?? - (mfolz@my-deja.com)


In article <8eo9q9$r6b$1@nnrp1.deja.com>, berli@my-deja.com wrote: > In article <390c683a.15787782@usenet.pitt.edu>, > sluss@no-square-canned-processed-meat.dhp.com (David E. Sluss) wrote: > > C Y N I C S > > O > > R Star Trek: Voyager: "Muse" > > N as reviewed by David E. Sluss > > E > > R copyright (c) 2000 Tiger Bay Publishing > > > > Spoilers ahead! > . > . > . > . > . > . > > > I'm surprised you didn't notice something else that ticked me off. Kim > claims to have traveled 200 kilometers to get to the delta flyer. Now, at > this point, it's been a week since Torres woke up, which I'd assume is 7 > days, and she'd been unconscious for 8 days before that (I don't know > much biology, but it seemed odd that after eight days under, with > bloodletting, she wasn't INCREDIBLY thirsty). Now, that makes 15 days, > although you might argue it down to 13. 200 km in 15 nights? Hello? 1 km > = .621 mi, 200km = 124.2 mi, 124.2 mi / 15 nights = 8.28 mi/night; the > average woman walks about 3mi/hr and the average man walks about 2mi/hr, > but let's assume that Kim is in pretty good shape and what with Starfleet > training, etc, can walk a womanly 3mi/hr; 8.28 mi / (3mi/hr) = 2.76 hr; > now some people can only walk for 15 minutes at a time, but let's assume > Starfleet boot camp, etc, let's even assume a 15 minute break (2.76 hr + > .25 hr = 3.01 hr): what the hell was Kim doing those other 21 hours of > the day??? > Well, he probably spent about 8 hours sleeping . . . he could have been hunting for food instead of eating rations . . . yeah right. Considering the time made by troops on military marches, Kim ought to have been able to do better than 3 mi/hr regardless. More likely explanation: Kim got "sidetracked" Chekov-style (think "the Apple" or "Spectre of the Gun") by some primitive damsel in distress for a couple days, but then remembered his duty (like Aeneas in Carthage, reminded in a dream by Janeway that his destiny is on Voyager) and tried to make double-time back to the DF, but of course was days late. Torres of course should have immediately noticed the discrepency. This means she can hold it over his head so he can't tell the Captain about her little experiment mixing pre-steel people and transporters. See, a little rationalization can explain everything! -MF http://brandeis.edu/~mfolz/stpb.html Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/ Before you buy.

2000-05-05 00:00:00 - Re: [VOY] Cynics Corner Review: "Muse" - (berli@my-deja.com)


In article <8f2Q4.13079$eO5.68021@typhoon.austin.rr.com>, "Stembolt" <Stembolt@austin.rr.combadge> wrote: >>Nitpicker's Guide > That's interesting. Do you have a URL? Actually, they're books, by Phil Farrand, but there is a URL too, http://www.nitcentral.com/ > I was ribbing you because I believe the word is *ignoramus* Not in the feminine case. , but I would > never really call you that. :-) Oy, such good manners! -berli -- Visit Berli's Star Trek Shack at its new home http://hermes.spaceports.com/~theshack/ -- More weirdness at http://members.dencity.com/berli/ Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/ Before you buy.

2000-05-05 00:00:00 - Re: Kim fritters away 21 hours a day when his CO isn't looking?? - (evilklowwn@aol.comedy)


MFolz doth write thus: > berli@my-deja.com wrote: >> In article <390c683a.15787782@usenet.pitt.edu>, >> sluss@no-square-canned-processed-meat.dhp.com (David E. Sluss) wrote: >> > C Y N I C S >> > O >> > R Star Trek: Voyager: "Muse" >> > N as reviewed by David E. Sluss >> > E >> > R copyright (c) 2000 Tiger Bay Publishing >> > >> > Spoilers ahead! >> . >> . >> . >> . >> . >> . >> > >> I'm surprised you didn't notice something else that ticked me off. Kim >> claims to have traveled 200 kilometers to get to the delta flyer. Now, at >> this point, it's been a week since Torres woke up, which I'd assume is 7 >> days, and she'd been unconscious for 8 days before that (I don't know >> much biology, but it seemed odd that after eight days under, with >> bloodletting, she wasn't INCREDIBLY thirsty). Now, that makes 15 days, >> although you might argue it down to 13. 200 km in 15 nights? Hello? 1 km >> = .621 mi, 200km = 124.2 mi, 124.2 mi / 15 nights = 8.28 mi/night; the >> average woman walks about 3mi/hr and the average man walks about 2mi/hr, >> but let's assume that Kim is in pretty good shape and what with Starfleet >> training, etc, can walk a womanly 3mi/hr; 8.28 mi / (3mi/hr) = 2.76 hr; >> now some people can only walk for 15 minutes at a time, but let's assume >> Starfleet boot camp, etc, let's even assume a 15 minute break (2.76 hr + >> .25 hr = 3.01 hr): what the hell was Kim doing those other 21 hours of >> the day??? >> > >Well, he probably spent about 8 hours sleeping . . . he could have been >hunting for food instead of eating rations . . . yeah right. > >Considering the time made by troops on military marches, Kim ought to >have been able to do better than 3 mi/hr regardless. IIRC, Kim said he'd been trying Not To Be Seen by the British government, which would take him on a slower route (hiding from the locals), as well as a few meanderings to find water, as well as having to circle around population centers. He-Who-Wonders-How-The-Playwright-Will-Top-B'Elanna's-Special-Effects ***************************************** B'Elanna slowly began to suspect that the "OFF" button on the Holodeck panel *wasn't* the Optical Frequency File, but the long-rumored, mythical "off" switch.

2000-05-05 00:00:00 - Re: Kim fritters away 21 hours a day when his CO isn't looking?? - (arlie88@aol.comNoSpam)


I, too, noted that 200 km isn't a whole lot to walk in two weeks. It's six and a half miles a day. I could easily walk more than that, and I'm no Parresis Squares champion. <g> But it was alien territory, and he could travel only at night, avoiding people. It probably meant he had to stay off the roads, which would have slowed him down. Also, it looked like Torres' shuttle crashed in the mountains, so he was probably hiking more than walking. Six miles a day in the mountains in the dark might well be a pretty brisk pace. -- Arlie